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Has music become less authentic due to the advancement in technology?

As technology continues to advance, the authenticity of music becomes questionable in modern day. Tom Spencer, Musician, and part of the bands, Prime Suspect and Lead, stated that “it’s a lot easier to manipulate a laptop than it is actually to pickup an instrument and start playing from scratch.”

 

An article written by Tony Sclafani, ‘Oh, my ears! Auto-Tune is ruining music’, explained that auto-tune is the longing to change the human voice and the search for flawlessness at the expenditure of true sentiment and talent. In the previous decade, Musical artists such as the Beatles and Frank Sinatra were able to record an entire in just a couple of days. In present time, musical artists are able to get by with just their appearance, while utilizing auto-tune to enhance their voice. Juan Reyes, a music student, noted that the mainstream media that utilize auto-tune lack soul, and feeling.

 

Osvaldo Oyola wrote an article called ‘In Defense on Auto-Tune‘ on the 12th of September 2011, in which he defends the use of auto tune by explaining that the main purpose of auto-tune is more problematic to note than the clear altering effect because when it is utilizes as planned, auto-tuning is a quiet procedure. Daryl Pratt, senior lecturer and chair of percussion at the University of Sydney, clarified that there are serious musicians who use auto-tune, and he further elaborated that the world has changed, but music is still valued.

 

Furthermore, Aziz Alhumaidhi, a part time DJ, elaborated that “I think the instrument is helpful and important, but in the end it’s the creation process. The way he or she expresses themselves and that doesn’t really change.” As technology continues to advance, there will be other forms of what is considered authentic music, and whether it is truly authentic is up to the audience.